I apologize for the late review. I’ve been having computer problems at home, so I can’t log in from there at the moment. I’m writing this from work, so I had to keep it brief. As a result, I chose to forgo the summary for the moment. It will follow at a later time. Read more for the review.

Cast

This episode starred Gillian Anderson (Dana Scully), Zachary Ansley
(Billy Miles), Tom Braidwood (Frohike), David Duchovny (Fox Mulder),
Annabeth Gish (Monica Reyes), Dean Haglund (Langley), Bruce Harwood
(Byers), Nicholas Lea (Alex Krycek), Robert Patrick (John Doggett),
James Perkins Jr. (Kirsch), and Mitch Pileggi (Walter Skinner).

Crew

The crew members that seemed to have the biggest impact this week
were Matt Beck (visual effects supervisor) Chris Carter (writer), Kim
Manners (director), Bill Roe (director of photography), and Mark Snow
(composer).

Original Airdate

Existence originally aired on Sunday May 20, 2001.

Synopsis

Since I’m posting from work, the synopsis will be following linked
from a comment when I get my home computer back online.

Random Blatherings

First of all, I’d like to point out that we haven’t seen the back
of Mulder’s neck clearly since his miraculous recovery. There’s no
guarantee that it really was Mulder kissing Scully. Krycek did tell
Skinner that killing Mulder would save thousands of lives…

Second, Krycek seemed to have a change of heart in the past few
months. What could cause such a drastic personality change? I won’t
be sure he’s dead until I see the back of the corpse’s neck. (Where
did the corpse go, anyway?)

Third, how did Skinner know where to find Doggett when he came back
into the FBI building? How would he know which floor Doggett ran to?

Fourth, who could have predicted the seeming
evidence that Scully’s baby is the rebirth of Christ?

High Point

Although the scene between Doggett and Kirsch was fantastic, I’d have
to say that the high point in the episode was the moment when Skinner
shot Krycek.

Low Point

For me, the low point of the episode was the kiss.

Review

This episode was nothing like any X-Files episode I can remember,
and I’ve seen them all. I give it 6 out of 6 for
originality.

The effects were great as well. From the makeup effects,
to the wounds to Krycek, to the reassembly of Billy Miles from a
single metal vertebra, the only qualm I have is the slight cartoony
quality of the bullet that landed between Krycek’s eyes. I give the
effects 5 out of 6.

The story and writing were also fantastic. The character
work with Doggett in his confrontation with Kirsch, the less than
comforting words from Reyes to Scully, and the various frantic, heated
discussions all kept the episode moving, and gave the cast and crew a
lot to work with. I give the writing 5 out of 6.

Speaking of the actors, they did a fantastic job this week. Robert
Patrick stole his final scene from Perkins and Gish, making it clear
that both the character and the actor will be able to determine the
future success of the X-Files. The writers can hand the X-Files over
to Doggett and Reyes, and I’ll keep watching, even though Reyes is a
lack-luster character. I give the acting 5 out of 6.

In terms of generating an emotional response, this episode
did a wonderful job. The cast and crew had me guessing, and kept me
paranoid and of balance. There were times when I felt Krycek should
not be trusted under any circumstances, and there were moments when I
thought he was the only character that could be trusted. I found
myself doubting Skinner’s motives for the first time since Paper
Clip
, and I was very anxious when Scully was giving birth in front
of so many, well, witnesses. I have to give this episode 5 out of 6.

The production this week was excellent. Mat Beck made this
stuff seem real, Mark Snow and Bill Roe maintained a fantastic
atmosphere, and Kim Manners kept it all together and made it move
along at a significant pace. I feel I would be ripping them off to
give them any less than 5 out of 6.

Overall, this is debatably the best episode so far in the
series. I feel compelled to give it 6 out of 6.

That adds up to a total of 37 out of 42, which is the highest score I’ve ever given. I find it hard to imagine myself giving a score this high again, actually.

Next Week

There won’t be new episodes of The
X-Files
until the fall, and there won’t be new episodes of The
Lone Gunmen
, ever. As a result, I’m not sure what to review next
week. You can help me decide; it’ll either be a movie (probably one I
have on DVD), or I can start reviewing X-Files from the beginning, and
build a database of reviews for the entire series. If you have any
requests, post them below, or e-mail me.