Weekly New Releases – September 8, 2020

Alfred Hitchcock Classics Collection
Amazon
Comments Includes Rear Window, Vertigo, Psycho, and The Birds.
Ava
Amazon
Bad Education
Amazon
Brute Force (Criterion Collection)
Amazon
Bull
Amazon
Candyman
Amazon
Cartoon Network: We Bare Bears Movie
Amazon
Cary Grant Collection
Amazon
Comments Includes Ladies Should Listen, Wedding Present, and Big Brown Eyes.
Chicago P.D.
Amazon
Comic (Arrow)
Amazon
Diabolik Lovers
Amazon
Comments Contains both seasons of the reverse harem shojo romantic drama series, about a girl being seduced by a family of vampires.
Dr. Who – Daleks’ Invasion Earth 2150 A.D.
Amazon
Dr. Who and the Daleks
Amazon
Frankie Drake Mysteries
Amazon
Comments Contains the original film by Kinji Fukusatsu, and the remake by Takeshi Miike.
Ghost in the Shell
Amazon
Graveyards of Honor (Arrow)
Amazon
Grey Fox
Amazon
Kentucky Kernels
Amazon
Men In Black 4 Movie Set
Amazon
Mighty Oak
Amazon
Mr. Mercedes
Amazon
Naked City (Criterion Collection)
Amazon
Nice Girl Like You
Amazon
One Piece
Amazon
Owners
Amazon
Prodigal Son
Amazon
Psycho
Amazon
Retaliation
Amazon
Sakura Quest
Amazon
Comments Re-release of the anime series about a office woman who ends up getting hired to run a rural Japanese town’s tourism board for a year, with the goal of revitalizing the town.
Saw
Amazon
Standard
Amazon
Straight Up
Amazon
Supergirl
Amazon
Superman: Man of Tomorrow
Amazon
True History of the Kelly Gang
Amazon
Up on the Glass
Amazon
Vampire Cleanup Department
Amazon
Waiting for the Barbarians
Amazon

Finally, the picks of the week. Alex says, “Ghost in the Shell is one of the anime films that really benefits from the conversion to 4K – which is why it’s my pick of the week, if you have a way to play 4K. Considering that the Kino Lorber releases have a new master, and some audio commentary and bonus features that could make this worth picking up, if you don’t have the ability to play 4K, the Kino Lorber Doctor Who Film releases are a good backup.” Blaine, “while I’m also interested in the bonus features on the Kino Lorber Doctor Who movie releases, I know the movies themselves aren’t much good, so I’m more confident recommending the Alfred Hitchcock releases.”

7 replies on “Weekly New Releases – September 8, 2020”

  1. Brian says:

    I’m in for Superman: Man of Tomorrow. Sure, I’ve seen Supe’s origin story a few hundred times, but I’m a sucker for DCAU movies.

  2. Dr. Who (inspired by but different from Doctor Who) was entertaining. It’s worth it for the candy colored Daleks at least.

  3. Jethro says:

    Wait a minute, what the hell is “Dr. Who”? This… this is some weird knock-off?…

    • JD DeLuzio says:

      With the success of the show in the 1960s, they released a couple of not-in-continuity films with a human “Doctor Who” and his two granddaughters.

      They were much later folded into continuity with a reference in one of the novels to the films, claiming they were films made based on the public’s semi-awareness of the Doctor’s existence.

      *cough*
      Incidentally, a believe there’s a passing reference to those films in a forthcoming novel set at an SF convention.
      *cough*

    • In addition to what JD has already said, they are a side effect of market expansion. In the 1960s, the BBC would edit together the first few episodes of a series (2 for hour-long timeslots, and 4 for half hour shows) into a movie and distribute that movie to international markets in Europe and Africa. If the “movie” was successful, it became easier to sell that show to local TV broadcasters. Since Doctor Who serials tended to run longer than that, and their most successful story arcs were much longer, they made the movies as a completely new production, with Peter Cushing (Grand Moff Tarkin) as the Doctor. The movie makers leaned heavily into comedy, turning Ian Chesterton (the most important companion in the history of the series) into a bumbling incompetent. The only “upgrade” one could argue for is, I think, the inclusion of colour, as the video technology they used to film the shows needed light levels that didn’t allow for the kind of black and white cinematography you’d get from, say, the original “Outer Limits” series.

      • Also:

        Happy Birthday!

      • JD DeLuzio says:

        I hadn’t thought of that angle. When The Munsters was cancelled in the U.S., they immediately planned a full-length, colour movie that would play the theatres but which was also used to promote the sell of the series to foreign markets. It’s basically in-continuity, though it recasts and reimagines the character of Marilyn.

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