This week, the review is done on time.

Cast

Tom
Welling
as
Clark Kent

Kristen Kreuk as
Lana Lang

Michael
Rosenbaum
as Lex Luthor

John
Glover

as Lionel Luthor

Annette
O’Toole
as Martha Kent

Erica Durance as
Lois Lane

Allison Mack as
Chloe Sullivan.

Written by Steven S. DeKnight.

Directed by James Marshall.

Original Airdate


Mercy
originally aired on Thursday,
April 20, 2006.

Synopsis

A strange assailant attacks Lionel physically and
psychologically.

High Point

The elevator conversation was pretty nifty, though
pretty much any of
Lionel’s dialogue from that point on could qualify.

Low Point

That’s a pretty specific lesson to learn from a man
who doesn’t know
you. The Hangman game pretty much implied a closer
relationship than
there was.

The Review

It’s a fairly original episode, putting
Lionel in an unusual
position, giving us new perspectives on his
relationships with the
other characters, and changing the nature of Clark’s
rescues. After
100 episodes, it’s hard to do something new, but
there’s a lot that’s
new here. I give it 5 out of 6.

The effects are physical effects, superpowers
we’ve seen many
times, or some rotten blue screening as John Glover
jumps away from
dangers that are obviously nowhere near where he is.
I give it 4 out
of 6.

The story is fairly well done. We don’t
learn a lot about
the villain, but that’s the point. The opening
sequence doesn’t quite
mesh with the rest of the episode, but once that’s out
of the way, the
rest works quite well. I give it 4 out of 6.

The acting from O’Toole and Glover was great,
and was the
driving force of the episode. When your episode is
being driven by
tension, you need to make sure your characters are
tense, and the
actors pulled it off nicely. I give it 5 out of 6.

The emotional response was damped a little by
the disconnect
between teaser and reveal, and by the painful amount
of time it took
the characters to realize it was an anagram. Still,
the last two acts
and their implications for Clark’s relationship with
both Luthors make
up for a lot of that. I give it 5 out of 6.

James Marshall did well with the production.
I had a hard
time not thinking of the set as the fake school
redressed, but that’s
not really the director’s fault in most cases. It
does somewhat irk
me that the characters’ faces were constantly well lit
while the set
wasn’t. I give it 5 out of 6.

Overall, it was a good episode, and a break
from the usual
teen angst we’ve been getting. I give it 5 out of 6.

In total,
Mercy
receives
33
out of 42.