13 replies on “Spider-Man 2 Teaser Online”

  1. GrimSean says:

    Fasten your seatbelt
    Indeed

  2. mbourgon says:

    WTF? Flash trailer?
    Yeah – good idea – make it hard to watch. It’s _publicity_, you _want_ it to get around. Idiots. Wait for the Quicktime version.

  3. majick says:

    Doc Oc’s accent.
    So, does anybody know what happened to Otto’s accent? The comics and cartoons have traditionally given the character a european accent, though I can’t recall exactly which country he was supposed to have come from.

    I haven’t paid too much attention to the development of the movie or it’s characters (though I will be first in line to see it), so I was just wondering if there was any known reasons for the change in the character.

    I always thought one of the things that made Doc Oc so much fun was the fact that he always had time to provide his victims and opponents with commentary as to why he’s such a genius and why he’ll defeat them. Then he proceeds to get his ass handed to him, neatly wrapped and delivered, and the whole time he continues to spout accented oaths and curses.

    What a nut!

    • Lurch_Kimded says:

      Re: Doc Oc’s accent.

      So, does anybody know what happened to Otto’s accent? The comics and cartoons have traditionally given the character a european accent.

      The actor is British (IMDB) so I guess they are going for the evil English enemy plot. That being said the guy is quiet a good actor and can manage a varying range so who knows.

      That being said I hope they up Spider-man’s sarcastic comments up a notch especially with Doc Oc. The fights will only be fun is peppered with Doc Oc smug superiority and Spider-mans sarcastic sound-bites. Anyway, I think that’s more than enough alliteration for one day.

  4. Daemonik says:

    RE:Sweeeeeet!
    Duuuuuuuude!

    • Timeshredder says:

      Seduction of the Innocent

      I enjoyed the preview, but it also had me laughing, recalling a passage from Seduction of the Innocent. For those of you who don’t know the reference, a deranged psychiatrist named Frederic Wertham published this book as part of a late 1940s/early 1950s crusade against comic books, which led to the comic publishers of America turning tail and adopting the original Comics Code, the cancelling of EC’s successful horror line, and lots of speaking engagements by Wertham with PTAs, police associations, and women’s clubs around the United States. In brief, Wertham claimed the comics caused juvenile deliquincy and homosexuality. No, really.

      Anyhoo, the Spidey preview oddly recalls this bit of scholarly logic:

      To advise a child not to read a comic book works only if you can explain to him your reasons. For example, a ten-year-old girl from a cultivated and literate home asked me why I thought it was harmful to read Wonder Woman (a crime comic which we have found to be one of the most harmful). She saw in her home many good books and I took that as a starting point. “Supposing,” I told her, “you get used to eating sandwiches made with very strong seasonings, with onions and peppers and highly spiced mustard. You will lose your taste for simple bread and butter and finer food. The same is true for reading strong comic books. If later on you want to read a good novel it may describe how a young boy and girl sit together and watch the rain falling. They talk about themselves and the pages of the book describe what their innermost little thoughts are. This is what is called literature. But you will never be able to appreciate that if in comic-book fashion you expect that at any moment someone will appear and pitch both of them out the window.”

      • wayfaring_familiar says:

        Re: Seduction of the Innocent

        This is what is called literature. But you will never be able to appreciate that if in comic-book fashion you expect that at any moment someone will appear and pitch both of them out the window.”

        Sounds to me like the man was a genius. ;-) I’m getting to the point where some days I get bored with sci-fi novels that don’t have any action in the first 50 pages. And I have a degree in literature.

        –>Wayf.

        • Timeshredder says:

          Re: Seduction of the Innocent

          Sounds to me like the man was a genius. ;-) I’m getting to the point where some days I get bored with sci-fi novels that don’t have any action in the first 50 pages. And I have a degree in literature.

          If you start stealing hubcaps or you feel your sexual orientation changing, let us know.

        • nkuzmik says:

          Re: Seduction of the Innocent

          This is what is called literature. But you will never be able to appreciate that if in comic-book fashion you expect that at any moment someone will appear and pitch both of them out the window.”

          Sounds to me like the man was a genius. ;-) I’m getting to the point where some days I get bored with sci-fi novels that don’t have any action in the first 50 pages. And I have a degree in literature.

          –>Wayf.

          First I would like to apologize for this rant, but I need to rationalize 2 years of Literature study with a profound apprciation with “intellectual crap*” like SF.
          The bet definition I’ve been able to come up with for “good” literature, be it novels, movies, comics, plays, anything, is as follows.
          Two people should sit down, read/watch the piece.

            One of them should walk away with a warm fuzzy feeling after pondering the subtle meanings and implications and parsing the symbolism and allusions.
            The other should walk away with a warm fuzzy feeling, thinking, “That was a fun/entertaining book/comic/play/movie.”

          Can anybody else agree with that?

          *A proff’s words, not mine.

          • Timeshredder says:

            Re: Rant

            I think arguments become confused, which leads to mainstream types condemning genre fiction (and never mind comic books) as inherently bad, while hardcore genre types have knee-jerk reactions to anything “literary” (hence the insistence by many SF publishers that writers should never admit to having taken a creative writing class, since those poseur literati couldn’t possibly know anything about good story-telling).

            Cheap industrial ingredients can be as much a element of mainstream books as of movies, comics, et cetera. If that’s all a person was exposed to, I suppose they might lose an appreciation for other types of writing and art. But it wouldn’t matter whether you found those ingredients in a novel or a comic. Pre-Hollywood and even pre-tv, tonnes of bad genre novels and stories were devoured by readers. Cheap writing goes where it will sell. Since fewer people read novels and stories now, it goes to movies and television and, I suppose, comics and genre fiction, which retain a broad readership.

            The comic Ghost World‘s topics come very close to Wertham’s example of good literature. And many great works of literature include sex and violence, handled well. Wertham simply equates one particular form (in his case, comics) with “bad” and one type of novel with “good,” and then throws in a lot of 1950s social paranoia and homophobia. His influence was significant– watch Blackboard Jungle and note the scene where the noble teacher casually makes a reference to getting his students off comic books, after he’s shown them a cheap animated cartoon and used it to generate intelligent discussion! But surely the content is at least as influential as the form or genre.

            And occasionally, even the most literary types might enjoy some cheap industrial stuff.

  5. Alexius says:

    Finally Saw It.
    Flash? WTF?

    Anyways, I Liked It, Looks Good. All The Webslinging Shots Looked Like Cut And Pastes From The First, Though. I Think They’ve Gone The ‘Well, They Liked The First, They’ll Pay For A Second’ route, And tried To Make More Of The First Movie, Rather Than A Second, New Movie. (Good Enough For Me, I’ll Still Go See It, Opening Day, But I’d Have Rather had A New Movie About Spider-man.)

    How Long Before They Dip Into The Venom Story Line, You Think?

    • Lurch_Kimded says:

      Re: Finally Saw It.

      How Long Before They Dip Into The Venom Story Line, You Think?

      As much as I would personally love to see a Venom story on the big screen I don’t think they will do it.

      On a more personal note I don’t know if Venom would work in a live action film. The would have to do a completley CG character to get it looking and feeling right, that alone would mean making an even better “Gollum”-styled character which would probably be too expensive.

      Either that or they could do the “alien suit” story arc with Venom only really appearing at the end and doing a “psychological thriller” thing with the suit taking over… or am I analysing too much.

  6. y42 says:

    Well
    I didn’t really like the first, but dude, that was SO sweet!

    I’ll remeber to turn off my criticism before I go see that one, just so’s I
    can enjoy it.

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