Due to the splintered storylines, we’re reviewing two episodes as one this week.

Titles: and “Brothers”

Written by Sean Tretta and Christopher Monfette
Directed by David Grossman and Joe Menendez

Aaron Stanford as James Cole
Barbara Sukowa as Dr. Katarina Jones
Emily Hampshire as Jennifer Goines
Amanda Schull as Dr. Cassandra Railly
Kirk Acevedo as José Ramse
Todd Stashwick as Deacon
Alisen Down as Olivia
Brooke Williams as Hannah Jones
Faran Tahir as Mallick
Andrew Gillies as Dr. Adler
Peter DaCunha as Samuel Ramse
Jack Fulton as Young Cole
Jordan James as Young Ramse
Jeffrey Parazzo as Thug
Priya Rajaratnam as Nurse
Tom Noonan as Pallid Man

Premise

Ramse captures Olivia and Jones and Cole resort to torture. As in reality, that devil’s bargain may not be producing the results they believe it is. Over in Titan, Deacon imagines conversations with his dead father.

Cole and Ramse travel back in time to kill the witness.

In 2007, Cole and Ramse see if their brotherly relationship is able to stand certain betrayals.

Deacon, with inside assistance, rescues Railly and both find their way back to 2046.

Jennifer Goines, plagued by nightmares, has a sit-down with Olivia.

High Point

The encounter between Olivia and Jennifer displays the strengths of both characters.

Low Point

Overall, the dialogue seems less natural than usual, and this affects the performances, especially in “Brothers.”

The Scores:

Originality: 4/6

Effects: 5/6

Acting: 5/6 Despite some unevenness, the show gets bonuses for Stanford and Hampshire’s performances, and the handling of that well-bred conversation between Cole and Ramse during the hold-up.

Story: 4/6 The story feels really fragmented in “Enemy;” much of it comes together in “Brothers.” The characters have real decisions to make and, unlike Railly and Deacon’s time-travel dilemma, these problems have no easy solutions.

Emotional Response: 5/6

Production: 6/6

Overall: 5/6

“Enemy” and “Brothers” receive a combined score of 34/42