The leaves brighten and brown and fall to the ground and the footsteps of costumed kids and masquerading party-goers crunch over them as they head for haunted happenings.

Time once again for our annual October Countdown, five seasonal shockers, one for each October weekend and one for Halloween Night. This year’s lunatic line-up includes midsommar horrors, a big-screen supervillain, a devilish documentary, and Japanese zombies, all from 2019.

For the final night, however, we dig into the past and review…. Well, that’s going to be up to you! Read on, my beastly Bureau-crats, and decide what past goody we’ll be picking or panning from the Halloween basket.

October 5: The Joker (2019)
October 12: Hail, Satan? (2019)
October 19: One Cut of the Dead (2019)
October 26: Midsommar (2019)
October 31: See our chilling choices below, and let us know your picks, rankings, and requests!

What awful offering would you like to see reviewed on October 31?

The Nun (2018): a traditional Gothic offering set in 1952 at convent that is not what it seems.

Scooby-Doo on Zombie Island (1998) and Scooby-Doo and the Witch’s Ghost (1999): Scooby’s most frightening case and its follow-up revived the series, and set the tone for the early twenty-first century adventures of Mystery, Inc.

Silver Bullet (1985): one of the less-successful adaptations of a Stephen King story, it nevertheless maintains a cult following, a sort of edgy, Addams-Family-Friendly film.

Private Parts (1972): I speak here of the creepy, controversial 70s cult thriller, not the Howard Stern film, which I will only watch at gunpoint. And if you reflect on the fact that I watched and kind of enjoyed this film, you will understand the depth of that rejection.

The Gorgon (1964) and The Reptile (1966): what would Halloween be without Hammer? We could do a double-feature of these two similar cinematic stories from the gallow’s-Swinging Sixties.

The Return of Dracula (1958): this American take on Dracula disappeared, in a large part due to the fact that it came out just before Christopher Lee’s first appearance as the Count.

The Cat and the Canary: (1927, 1939, and 1978): triple-feature of the three surviving adaptations of the hugely popular play, which cast shadows on both horror cinema and superhero comic books.

Vote below!