V For Vendetta Interview

chad writes, SciFi.com has published an interesting interview with the principle players of the upcoming V For Vendetta movie. The interviewees are Natalie Portman, James McTeigue (director), David Lloyd (illustrator of the original comic series), and Joel Silver (producer). They answer several questions, such as why the film wasn’t released on November 5th as originally intended, and also why the initial actor for V, James Purefoy, quit after three weeks of filming.

7 replies on “V For Vendetta Interview”

  1. krilia says:

    Interview with Alan Moore
    On MTV.com

    It talks about how the framework was used to a certain extent, but that the themes of the movie are NOT the themes of the graphic novel, and pretty much says in no uncertain terms that they should have written something original set in near-future America instead of hijacking his work.

    • pogle says:

      Re: Interview with Alan Moore
      I say that about almost every book adaptation movie I see. The Bourne crap, I Robot, etc. They really should have left the awesomeness of the books alone, and made the exact same movie without degrading the name of the books. The movies could mostly stand on their own, but noooo, they have to steal and trash a good book/comic/etc just to have a better media label.

      • krilia says:

        Re: Interview with Alan Moore

        I say that about almost every book adaptation movie I see. The Bourne crap, I Robot, etc. They really should have left the awesomeness of the books alone, and made the exact same movie without degrading the name of the books. The movies could mostly stand on their own, but noooo, they have to steal and trash a good book/comic/etc just to have a better media label.

        My big comment is that I realize that yes, they need to trim things for time. But then why do they cut things for time and then cut more things to make room for their own inventions that weren’t in the book? That applies more to some other adaptions than it does to this one, however.

  2. mbourgon says:

    Funny.
    Saw this on Saturday, I quite enjoyed it. A friend who went saw it, and said that while he saw changes, they were more "Lord of The Rings" changes, rather than being as substantial as Moore said.

    Just my take on my friend’s opinion.

    • krilia says:

      Re: Funny.

      Saw this on Saturday, I quite enjoyed it. A friend who went saw it, and said that while he saw changes, they were more "Lord of The Rings" changes, rather than being as substantial as Moore said.

      Just my take on my friend’s opinion.

      Heh, and I agree. I just found the changes to LotR substantial in some cases! I complained until my friends rolled their eyes about changes to personalities, like Faramir or Arwen.

      • pogle says:

        Re: Funny.
        That was exactly my problem with LotR. I love the movies by and large, and understood most of the edits (the warg thing was totally just weird tho). My main beef was the character assassination to no good effect.

  3. antihero says:

    Here’s the thing:
    I love Moore’s writing, but man does he have a bug up his ass about his work. He’s like an overprotective mother insisting that her kids wear helmets at all times. I suppose you just have to be a nigh-insane mountain man of a comic book writer to get it.

    Although I do think it is the ballsiest statement possible that not only does he insist on having his name removed from so many things ("I refuse to have my name attached to this sandwich in the breakroom fridge"), he also won’t take any of the revenue. That seems like it’d be a very very difficult stand to make- comic books don’t make you fabulously wealthy, after all. So you have to respect that.

Comments are closed.