Space Shuttle Discovery, the oldest and most experienced shuttle in the fleet has come home, one final time.

Endeavor and Atlantis are still scheduled for their own missions, but Discovery marks the beginning of the end for a 30-year era at NASA.

Discovery Retrospective from NASA

To get an idea of what she’s accomplished, look at it this way:

  • Spent a just over a year in space (365 days, 12 hours, 53 minutes, 34 seconds)
  • Flown a distance equivalent to 1.5 trips to the Sun.

Some of the milestones for Discovery:

Aug. 30, 1984 – Maiden Flight

Sept. 29, 1988 – Return to Flight after Challenger accident

April 24, 1990 – Launch of Hubble Space Telescope

Feb. 3, 1994 – First flight of a Russian cosmonaut on a shuttle

Feb. 3, 1995 – First Mir rendezvous; first female pilot

Feb. 11, 1997 – Highest altitude known for a shuttle flight

June 2, 1998 – Final shuttle-Mir docking

Oct. 29, 1998 – Flight to return John Glenn to orbit as oldest human to fly in space

Oct. 11, 2000 – Z1 Integrated Truss Structure and PMA-3 to the International Space Station

March 8, 2001 – First ISS crew rotation

July 26, 2005 – Return to Flight after Columbia accident

Dec. 9, 2006 – P5 Truss installed

May 31, 2008 – Delivery of Japan’s Kibo Laboratory to ISS

March 15, 2009 – Completed ISS Integrated Truss Segment

August 28, 2009 – Final use of the shuttle for full ISS crew rotation

And some damn impressive numbers:

Total miles traveled: 148,221,675

Total time in orbit: 365 days, 12 hours, 53 minutes, 34 seconds

Total orbits: 5,830

Total flights: 39

Total crew members: 246

Mir dockings: 1

International Space Station dockings: 13