Awhile back, Bongo comics brought the characters from Futurama into the world of The Simpsons with the parodically-titled Futurama/Simpsons Infinitely Secret Crossover Crisis. In 2005, they collide these two worlds once more– and throw in unlicensed appearances by numerous characters from literature, and superheroes from DC and Marvel comics.

General Information

Title: The Simpsons/Futurama Crossover Crisis II #1-2
Writer: Ian Boothby
Artists: Hanes Kkitdm Steve Steere, Jr., Rick Reese.

Premise:

An invention of Professor Farnsworth’s breaks down the barriers between realities and brings the characters from a Simpsons comic– pretty much all of Springfield– into the world of Futurama. Attempts to destroy the dangerous device open up a vortex outside the New York Public Library and bring every fictional character in history into the same world. The “fics,” lacking constitutional rights, become slaves, but they rebel, causing trouble and hilarity.

High Points

Stop hopping on my pop!

The wit and inspired silliness– particularly of #2– nicely recalls The Simpsons of seasons past.

Low Point

One expects– and gets– sight gags and allusions aplenty, and plenty of these are amusing. The “outer space” tv commercials, however, seemed like filler.

The Scores

Originality: 4/6 It’s a fairly original spoof of crossovers.

Artwork: 5/6 The comics feature great cartoony chicken fat stuff; Where’s Waldoesque panels ooze visual silliness. I’ve posted some images here and here.

Story: 3/6 You’re expecting too much if you’re looking for anything more than a string of jokes, connected by minimal plot logic.

Characterization: 3/6 Well, it’s consistent, if over the top in places, even for cartoon characters.

Homer uses a sophisticated device for nothing more than the opportunity to laugh at Flanders scratching his butt. *HA-ha.*

Emotional response: 4/6 You know, this is pretty funny– especially #2.

Flow 3/6.

Overall: 4/6 This would be higher, but #1 isn’t as strong as #2.

In total, The Simpsons/Futurama Crossover Crisis II #1-2 receive a score of 26/42.

Feel free to throw in a couple of bonus points if you feel our rating system wasn’t made with something like this in mind.