Braga Fishing for Compliments

Well, he’s using the cover of his official website to do it, but since he’s contributed to the production of 100 episodes of Star Trek, he feels you should fire off a congratulatory message.

Go on, let him know what you really think of his “contributions” to Star Trek.

8 replies on “Braga Fishing for Compliments”

  1. TechnoGirl says:

    Barf !
    What an utter schmuck! Talk about your self-serving websites….geez…

    This week I’ve just turned off my cable… television sucks. Bermen and Braga are a good example of why it will continue to suck.

  2. joe__gee says:

    My quick letter …
    Congratulations …

    Like Christopher Tolkien you have inherited a successful franchise. To see what people who aren’t in a fawning mood are saying about your work, I suggest you visit a site like https://www.bureau42.com . We’re trying really hard to like this latest series. We tried really hard to like Nemesis.

    Something is missing. The missing element is not necessarily Roddenberry. Have you ever thought that what might be missing is a solid connection to real, everyday fans? A hint, these fans are not check-writing studio sycophants or Nielson wonks, some of them are the people who speak Klingonese, some of them wear blue antennae out in public, some of them have memorized all the tech manuals and can tell you how a transporter works, but most of them just identify with the themes of TOS and The Next Generation, or ejnoy the story arc of DS-9.

    Ask these people what they think. You’ve lost the Trek core audience, and you’re not really doing anything to bring anyone else in. Males 18 to 35 can get action-packed tight outfits, jelly smearing, and fart jokes on other channels. Those of us who prefer can get better-conceived time travel shows by watching Doctor Who reruns. Why do we need to get these things from “Star Trek”?

    You’ve inherited a franchise, but its appeal is diminishing rapidly under your care.

    Although I don’t wear blue antennae, speak Klingonese, or know the inside of a warp nacelle like the back of my hand, I am conscious enough of how things were supposed to have happened to know that unless you do something quickly you’ve probably lost me. I really *want* to like Enterprise. I really want to be excited about Trek. I can’t say I really give a damn about these things as they stand today.

    Sincerely,

    -Joe G.

    • joe__gee says:

      Why did I write to Rick Berman, whoops?
      Same difference. Braga won’t get it anyways.

      -Joe

    • nkuzmik says:

      Re: My quick letter …

      Congratulations …

      Like Christopher Tolkien you have inherited a successful franchise. To see what people who aren’t in a fawning mood are saying about your work, I suggest you visit a site like https://www.bureau42.com . We’re trying really hard to like this latest series. We tried really hard to like Nemesis.

      Something is missing. The missing element is not necessarily Roddenberry. Have you ever thought that what might be missing is a solid connection to real, everyday fans? A hint, these fans are not check-writing studio sycophants or Nielson wonks, some of them are the people who speak Klingonese, some of them wear blue antennae out in public, some of them have memorized all the tech manuals and can tell you how a transporter works, but most of them just identify with the themes of TOS and The Next Generation, or ejnoy the story arc of DS-9.

      Ask these people what they think. You’ve lost the Trek core audience, and you’re not really doing anything to bring anyone else in. Males 18 to 35 can get action-packed tight outfits, jelly smearing, and fart jokes on other channels. Those of us who prefer can get better-conceived time travel shows by watching Doctor Who reruns. Why do we need to get these things from “Star Trek”?

      You’ve inherited a franchise, but its appeal is diminishing rapidly under your care.

      Although I don’t wear blue antennae, speak Klingonese, or know the inside of a warp nacelle like the back of my hand, I am conscious enough of how things were supposed to have happened to know that unless you do something quickly you’ve probably lost me. I really *want* to like Enterprise. I really want to be excited about Trek. I can’t say I really give a damn about these things as they stand today.

      Sincerely,

      -Joe G.

      I’m having trouble figuring out if that letter was brass knuckles or kid gloves… I’m thinking both

      Very,very nice.

      • Alexius says:

        Re: My quick letter …

        Congratulations …
        *********SNIP**************
        -Joe G.

        I’m having trouble figuring out if that letter was brass knuckles or kid gloves… I’m thinking both

        Very,very nice.

        Brass Gloves?

        • Timeshredder says:

          Gee, Joe….
          I can’t match Joe’s letter, but mine will go something like this:

          So, you want our congratulations?

          Congratulations for inheriting a franchise that was running low on inspiration, finally coming up with a concept that could breathe new life into it…. And then setting about on a campaign to exclude anything that might constitute “new life.”

          Obviously, a show set in the early years of the Federation is not going to please every fan’s concept of Trek history, nor can fans expect continuity to emerge entirely unscathed. We’d excuse that if the show were worth watching. But Enterprise hasn’t even delivered good television, much less respectable Trek.

          The original series, for its time, was far-thinking in respect to race, gender, and the future. It attempted, at least occasionally, to bring SF concepts to television. That’s what launched (with delays) the cash cow that is Star Trek. Enterprise could sacrifice pieces of Trek‘s somewhat dated vision if it tried to be as far-reaching for 2003 as the first series was for the 1960s. And it could justify calling itself Enterprise if it explored the interesting possibilities suggested by the forming of an interspecies Federation.

          Little attempt has been made to accomplish any of these things. Instead of an inclusive society, we have the same few non-white tokens. Instead of a thoughtful approach to gender and sexuality, we have alien babes in bunny suits, even when that flatly contradicts everything established about the alien race in question. Instead of SF, we see forehead aliens who will never appear in the established future and anachronistic species whose appearance assails continuity. And, instead of the virgin territory the historical context presents, we get episodes that baldly go where every incarnation of the show has gone before.

          So, yeah. Congratulations. Your involvement in 100 episodes is a milestone, and I suppose fans will congratulate you on that. But you’ve created a millstone around the neck of an inspirational series, one whose success helped bring SF into the mainstream, and I doubt many fans will thank you for that.

          • joe__gee says:

            Um, yes you can, this is very good. :)

            I can’t match Joe’s letter, but mine will go something like this:

            Berman and Braga seem to have lost contact with the ST fan base. When they ask for comments we need to provide them. I love your milestone/millstone word play.

            This letter is very well written. :)

            -Joe

          • theangrymob says:

            Re: Gee, Joe….

            I can’t match Joe’s letter, but mine will go something like this:

            These are both great letters. Let us know if you get a response back. It’s a long shot, but it wouldn’t be fair to not include a rebuttal.

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