Battlestar Galactica– “Water”

Battlestar Galactica maintains the tension through the second episode, and deepens the puzzle of Boomer.


“Water”

Cast and Crew:

Edward James Olmos as Commander Adama
Mary McDonnell as President Laura Roslin
Katee Sackhoff as Kara “Starbuck” Thrace
Jamie Bamber as Lee “Apollo” Adama
James Callis as Dr. Gaius Baltar
Tricia Helfer as Number 6
Grace Park as Sharon “Boomer” Valerii
Michael Hogan as Col. Tigh

Writer: Ronald D. Moore

Director: Marta Grabiak

Plot:

“Boomer” wakes up covered in water and discovers some missing explosive charges. Soon after, an explosion releases critical water supplies into space.

High Points:

The remarkable contrast between beautifully-filmed space opera– the ships in flight, the water pouring into space– and small character moments– Tigh examining his bottle, Starbuck lighting her rare cigar. With Kara, Galactica does something well which recent incarnations of Star Trek have muffed badly. Yeah, they’ve created a butt-kicking Space Babe, but they’ve made her believable, personally flawed, and filled with ambivalent attitudes towards others. Notice her interaction with Dr. Baltar in this episode, in particular. They’ve also shown no interest in gratuitous exploitation.

Low Point:

I accepted the dramatic coincidence in last week’s plot— though others found it irksome. Sometimes, coincidences happen, and in this case we don’t know for certain if the supposed presence of someone with information on Baltar aboard the Olympia is a coincidence. However, they shouldn’t have something like that happen every week.

In the second episode, Boomer’s ship happens to be the one that discovers the necessary water. The episode uses this fact well, giving us some tense moments and further insight into how the Cylon sleeper agents work. At that point, however, I start to worry if unlikely dramatic coincidence will become a staple on this generally excellent show.

The Scores:

Originality: 4/6. Hard SF, particularly the earlier stuff, often based plots on the handling and risks to basic necessities in space. Such plots have been surprisingly rare in mass-media SF, however.

Effects: 6/6

Story: 4/6 The episode maintained a high level of intensity. The show’s story-arc approach works well for character development, but it also means that we can expect most episodes, like this one, will leave much unresolved. How much should we consider overall story arc– which we’ve not yet seen– in ranking an episode’s story?

Acting: 5/6. I accept these characters– though the Presidential Aide seems a little less believable than the others.

Emotional Response: 5/6 The tension remains high, and I’m starting to care about the characters. I’m particularly interesting in seeing how the sleeper agent develops– and I would refer back to my “High Points” for commentary on another character.

Production: 6/6.

Overall: 5/6

In total, “Water” receives 35/42

Additional Comments:

1.We’re learning more about the sleeper agents– though we still don’t know what the Boomer on occupied Caprica intends.

2. The original Battlestar Galactica ran into a handful of alien species. This episode refers to most of space as “barren,” and suggests that we won’t be stopping in on the Tucana Lounge Singers in this new series. Clearly, the colonies are the only known easily-habitable planets. This is likely for the best, since (1) the lack of life-friendly planets makes pit stops more difficult and (2) the lack of other civilizations strengthens the conflict between humans and Cylons. Still, I have to wonder how the people behind this show would handle, say, the Ovians.

39 replies on “Battlestar Galactica– “Water””

  1. Daemonik says:

    Co-inki-dink

    I accepted the dramatic coincidence in last week’s plot– though others found it irksome. Sometimes, coincidences happen, and in this case we don’t know for certain if the supposed presence of someone with information on Baltar aboard the Olympia is a coincidence. However, they shouldn’t have something like that happen every week.

    Let’s be honest for a moment. ‘Dramatic coincidence’ is something that is going to happen no matter what in any series that focuses on a select group of individuals. Stories will involve them in various plots that by their nature will have to involve certain amounts of coincidence in order to keep them active. Events will always unfold in such a way as to keep the main characters as the center of the action. I can not recall a series that has ever had character development plots that were entirely based on the actions of other characters.

    What matters most, I think, is that the coincidences don’t seem like blatant writer’s block loopholes and instead fit more into the plausible storyline. So far the writers are doing an admirable job keeping the coincidences in line and not terribly stretching the plausability of the series.

    • Eldhrin says:

      Re: Co-inki-dink

      I accepted the dramatic coincidence in last week’s plot– though others found it irksome. Sometimes, coincidences happen, and in this case we don’t know for certain if the supposed presence of someone with information on Baltar aboard the Olympia is a coincidence. However, they shouldn’t have something like that happen every week.

      Let’s be honest for a moment. ‘Dramatic coincidence’ is something that is going to happen no matter what in any series that focuses on a select group of individuals. Stories will involve them in various plots that by their nature will have to involve certain amounts of coincidence in order to keep them active. Events will always unfold in such a way as to keep the main characters as the center of the action. I can not recall a series that has ever had character development plots that were entirely based on the actions of other characters.

      What matters most, I think, is that the coincidences don’t seem like blatant writer’s block loopholes and instead fit more into the plausible storyline. So far the writers are doing an admirable job keeping the coincidences in line and not terribly stretching the plausability of the series.

      You must also remember the big important fact that there are fewer than fifty thousand people in the fleet. Therefore only a select few possess the skills required to handle missions which are generally the focus of the show when they’re happening. So yes, lots of things happen to the people we’re following, but there aren’t really very many other people in teh fleet who could do what they’re doing anyway.

      • vanyel says:

        Re: Co-inki-dink

        there aren’t really very many other people in teh fleet who could do what they’re doing anyway.

        That’s true, but they should still keep away from the painfully convenient coincidences. If it were real, those small numbers would mean that successes would be few.

        My low point on this episode was to wonder if sending people all over the place in faint hope of finding water was really more productive than rigging some way of netting the ice blocks that would have formed from the escaping water. They may not have gotten it all back, but I’ll bet they could have gotten a large percentage — at least half. And rather than letting the waste water from the other ships get away, they’d be rigging up a way to get it to the ships with recycling systems.

        • Timeshredder says:

          Re: Co-inki-dink

          I’m not sure that finding water is that difficult, given their jump capabilities, but I did wonder about the other two options you mentioned. Perhaps we’ll hear a reference in a future ep to the program to improve the fleet’s water-recycling capability.

          (which by itself would, however, be a lame premise for an entire episode: ).

          • Eldhrin says:

            Re: Co-inki-dink

            I’m not sure that finding water is that difficult, given their jump capabilities, but I did wonder about the other two options you mentioned. Perhaps we’ll hear a reference in a future ep to the program to improve the fleet’s water-recycling capability.

            (which by itself would, however, be a lame premise for an entire episode: ).

            Don’t worry, they don’t. Should I have said that?

            Anyway, I think their water-recycling capabilities are really quite impressive. The fact that Galactica’s recycling systems are good enough to handle water recycling for at least a quarter of the ships in the fleet and for herself really shows some fancy life support technology.

            It’s also impressive that they have the equipment for mining a water source somewhere in the fleet – they’d have been really stuck without that! I know that’s convenient, but you hardly get a series if they all die of thirst within a week.

            • Kaki says:

              Re: Co-inki-dink

              It’s also impressive that they have the equipment for mining a water source somewhere in the fleet – they’d have been really stuck without that! I know that’s convenient, but you hardly get a series if they all die of thirst within a week.

              In the next episode after “Water” one of the techs lists what they will need to get the water and it sounded to me like they were going to be putting together basic components to make what they needed.

              Which raises the question, why are the reviews a week behind? I don’t mean to disparage those who put work into the site, but doesn’t it kind of break up the discussion a bit?

            • valen1260 says:

              Re: Co-inki-dink

              Don’t worry, they don’t. Should I have said that?

              No. You “we’ve been watching this for months” people should learn to make use of the spoiler tags.

        • joe__gee says:

          Re: Co-inki-dink

          My low point on this episode was to wonder if sending people all over the place in faint hope of finding water was really more productive than rigging some way of netting the ice blocks that would have formed from the escaping water. They may not have gotten it all back, but I’ll bet they could have gotten a large percentage — at least half. And rather than letting the waste water from the other ships get away, they’d be rigging up a way to get it to the ships with recycling systems.

          They would only recover a very low percentage. Have you ever seen photos of an ISS or shuttle waste dump? Water instantly boils in a vaccuum — vaporizes — then with nothing to hold the vapor together it disperses. You’d still have water molecules floating in space, but they would be very challenging to collect as they would quite rapidly disperse, in three dimensions.

          Although very few crystals would form, any crystals that managed it would sublimate quickly, similar to the way that ice evaporates in a frost-free refrigerator. Recover them in a matter of minutes or they’re gone forever too.

          :(

          Galactica’s water, as soon as it was spaced, would have been lost unless one of those ships happens to be a ram scoop, but that’s not likely since these ships are designed with FTL in mind.

          From our own telescopic observations we know proto-planetary discs are relatively common around young stars. My thinking was they needed to find a star system with an Oort cloud and harvest a comet or two. Heck, you could even shrink wrap a few and tow them along, assuming their FTL allows for a vehicle to tow another object. You’d have water ice, lots of juicy organic compounds, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, sulphur, perfect stuff for hydroponics or for direct conversion into food depending on how advanced they are.

          Anyhoo, I enjoyed this episode as much as I enjoyed the one that preceeded it. This is a GREAT series. :)

          -Joe G.

          • vanyel says:

            Re: Co-inki-dink

            They would only recover a very low percentage. Have you ever seen photos of an ISS or shuttle waste dump? Water instantly boils in a vaccuum — vaporizes — then with nothing to hold the vapor together it disperses.

            OK, I shoulda realized that. In my best Emily Latelle: “never mind” ;-)

            • joe__gee says:

              Not your fault … I have a mind for minutiae. %)

              They would only recover a very low percentage. Have you ever seen photos of an ISS or shuttle waste dump? Water instantly boils in a vaccuum — vaporizes — then with nothing to hold the vapor together it disperses.

              OK, I shoulda realized that. In my best Emily Latelle: “never mind” ;-)

              Which doesn’t necessarily translate into having a mind for practical ideas. %)

              -Joe G.

          • Kaki says:

            Re: Co-inki-dink

            They would only recover a very low percentage.

            I’m mostly with you on this one. One would need large pieces of fabric (the tighter the weave the better, tight enough and even the molecular water might be catchable) to catch the little crystal drops. The dispersal in 3-d wouldn’t be that big a problem given how fast their ships can move (assuming their EVA suits are proportionally capable), just a lot of flying in circles to be always catching the outer edges of the cloud. So it would be worth it to try in the few minutes after the explosion if one had fabric in the size needed, but they very likely don’t have big planes of fabric onboard. So no dice. (I wonder if any of the ships have big cargo bays that can open. Those might very well have been worth using.)

            My thinking was they needed to find a star system with an Oort cloud and harvest a comet or two.

            Bingo. This is the winning idea. Going into deeper gravity wells is just silly when their are likely some comets around.

            • joe__gee says:

              Re: Co-inki-dink

              I’m mostly with you on this one. One would need large pieces of fabric (the tighter the weave the better, tight enough and even the molecular water might be catchable) to catch the little crystal drops. The dispersal in 3-d wouldn’t be that big a problem given how fast their ships can move (assuming their EVA suits are proportionally capable), just a lot of flying in circles to be always catching the outer edges of the cloud. So it would be worth it to try in the few minutes after the explosion if one had fabric in the size needed, but they very likely don’t have big planes of fabric onboard. So no dice. (I wonder if any of the ships have big cargo bays that can open. Those might very well have been worth using.)

              They would have needed the ability to mobilize *very* quickly, as well as the ability to quickly maneuver nearby ships in the fleet to a safe distance. The humans might have a water recovery team *now*, hindsight is 20/20, but I’d bet they didn’t have one before.

              You’re right about the fabric. If they have mastered FTL I am certain they’d be able to manufacture a fabric woven of some dense molucule, maybe carbon nanotubes, that would be capable of securing individual water molecules. For that matter they could also use high energy radio waves (or electronic shielding) to confine the molecules to a small region, to compress them, and finally to “herd” them into positively charged molecular nets.

              But they’d probably never experienced a blown water tank on a battlestar in a situation where the battlestar wasn’t within easy jump distance of an inhabited human world …

              Fun thought exercize, but I’d bet the episode’s authors didn’t get this in-depth. We should consult. :)

              -Joe G.

              • GrimSean says:

                Re: Co-inki-dink

                Fun thought exercize, but I’d bet the episode’s authors didn’t get this in-depth. We should consult. :)

                This isn’t the series where the writers should consult with the fans – these guys are doing great on their own.

                There’s another series that used to take scripts from fans, but they stopped that. Put an accountant in charge, if I remember correctly. They started doing episodes that resolved themselves with huge Deus Ex Machina after having killed off main characters and realizing that there was no other way to fix it.

                Galactica is setting a new high water mark, and I’m starting to wonder if the rumours are true, because with the current creative team (notwithstanding Manny Coto) I don’t think Enterprise can keep up.

                • joe__gee says:

                  Re: Co-inki-dink

                  This isn’t the series where the writers should consult with the fans – these guys are doing great on their own.

                  You’re quite right. %)

                  I wonder how much of a role the setting of the current Trek series, along with the reverence placed on the history of series by its fans contributes to the bind faced by its writers when trying to think of new plot directions? :/ I’m not defending B & B’s mismanagement of the Trek franchise, but BG’s writers don’t face a rabid fan base — they have the luxury of working from an original series that could be gutted and rearranged to suit them.

                  -Joe G.

                  P.S. I know this is a review for last week’s episode, but did anyone catch the “Aliens” quote in this week’s episode? I love the way BG’s writers quote the genre, from Starbuck’s “frelling” in the miniseries to little tidbits like the quote this week. I might be wrong, but as far as I know “stay frosty” is not a regular expression in day to day English. I took it as a nod to “Aliens”. :)

                  • J_W_W says:

                    Re: Co-inki-dink

                    “frelling”

                    Thats fracking, not frelling. BG had its own made up swear words long before Farscape. Though I’m still waiting for Starbuck to say feldercarb. :-)

                    Back on to the episode. Did anyone notice that Baltars Cylon babe-in-his head didn’t make a single appearance in the poker scene with Starbuck? I’m still wondering if she’s a figment of his imagination, or implanted by the cylons. Most of the stuff she mentions, could be though out by Baltar by himself (ala a conscience, or his subconscious). The only thing that she’s told him that I don’t feel he may have figured out himself is the identity of the cylon agent on Galactica in the miniseries. But maybe he’s noticed something about them his conscious mind hasen’t realized yet.

                    • joe__gee says:

                      Starbuck said frelling …

                      Thats fracking, not frelling. BG had its own made up swear words long before Farscape. Though I’m still waiting for Starbuck to say feldercarb. :-)

                      Yes, I know, it’s fracking. That’s why when Starbuck said “frelling” in the miniseries it stuck out. In fact, several people in here remarked on it. I think it’s also mentioned in the miniseries review. :)

                      -Joe G.

                    • valen1260 says:

                      Re: Co-inki-dink

                      Thats fracking, not frelling. BG had its own made up swear words long before Farscape. Though I’m still waiting for Starbuck to say feldercarb. :-)

                      “Frack” is so painful to hear. I know it’s just to please the censors, but it’s like a little kid saying “fudge” so he doesn’t get his mouth washed out with soap. Swear words aren’t taboo because of the word so much as the meaning behind the word. If it means fuck (and it does), just say fuck. Let the censors beep it out and I won’t have to cringe when watching the DVDs.

                    • J_W_W says:

                      Re: Co-inki-dink

                      Thats fracking, not frelling. BG had its own made up swear words long before Farscape. Though I’m still waiting for Starbuck to say feldercarb. :-)

                      “Frack” is so painful to hear. I know it’s just to please the censors, but it’s like a little kid saying “fudge” so he doesn’t get his mouth washed out with soap. Swear words aren’t taboo because of the word so much as the meaning behind the word. If it means fuck (and it does), just say fuck. Let the censors beep it out and I won’t have to cringe when watching the DVDs.

                      As a 9 year old watching the original, I thought it was pretty cool.

                      I know its just for the censors, but with the new series it is now nostalgia, they’ve gotta do it. I just wish they’d have kept centons, but that would have made 33 are really confusing and hard to follow episode. ;-)

                    • valen1260 says:

                      Re: Co-inki-dink

                      Did anyone notice that Baltars Cylon babe-in-his head didn’t make a single appearance in the poker scene with Starbuck? I’m still wondering if she’s a figment of his imagination, or implanted by the cylons. Most of the stuff she mentions, could be though out by Baltar by himself (ala a conscience, or his subconscious). The only thing that she’s told him that I don’t feel he may have figured out himself is the identity of the cylon agent on Galactica in the miniseries. But maybe he’s noticed something about them his conscious mind hasen’t realized yet.

                      I’ve been wondering this myself. Perhaps he’s suffered a complete nervous collapse, but his intellect has allowed him to keep functioning. The Cylon could just be, as you suggested, a voice for his—for lack of a better word—instinct.

              • Kaki says:

                Re: Co-inki-dink
                What about whatever they use to make gravity? If they can turn that up to higher g’s, they could have flown a ship through the cloud of water crystals and pulled them to the top of the ship.

                • Eldhrin says:

                  Re: Co-inki-dink

                  What about whatever they use to make gravity? If they can turn that up to higher g’s, they could have flown a ship through the cloud of water crystals and pulled them to the top of the ship.

                  That’s an interesting idea.

                  Of course, we have no idea how most of their technology works.

                  • Kaki says:

                    Re: Co-inki-dink

                    Of course, we have no idea how most of their technology works.

                    True-nuf.

                    I guess I just realized that we were attacking the problem with a sort of “primitive” mindset. Flying fabric sheets around at high speed and all, when they seem to have more at their disposal.

                    Even in “hard sci-fi” hard problems can be easy given a single “magic-like” technology.

    • brainwise says:

      Re: Co-inki-dink

      I accepted the dramatic coincidence in last week’s plot– though others found it irksome. Sometimes, coincidences happen, and in this case we don’t know for certain if the supposed presence of someone with information on Baltar aboard the Olympia is a coincidence. However, they shouldn’t have something like that happen every week.

      But only Baltar (and, by extension, many viewers) thought that the good doctor (his name escapes me) aboard the Olympia had info about Baltar. I don’t think that is the case.

      In the aftermath of this episode, it appears that the presence of the Olympia allowed the Cylons to track down the fleet. This would seem to indicate that there was some kind of tracking device on board that ship — or sleeper agents were somehow broadcasting its position. Remember, the Cylons didn’t even attack the Olympia even though it didn’t make the jump with the rest of the fleet.

      So…. given this information, perhaps the good doctor on the Olympia knew about Cylon presence on his ship and wanted to warn the President and only the President about it. He couldn’t take the chance of having his information intercepted by a Cylon agent, or overheard by one — which would have happened if he just spoke to the President via radio. So he wanted to speak to her directly.

      Baltar’s paranoia served as another hook for the Cylon-in-his-head to play with. And it worked to further his character development and tease the audience with some more of his frets and squirms.

      Of course, I could be completely wrong. But the doc is dead, so we don’t know what exactly he had in mind.

      • valen1260 says:

        Re: Co-inki-dink

        In the aftermath of this episode, it appears that the presence of the Olympia allowed the Cylons to track down the fleet. This would seem to indicate that there was some kind of tracking device on board that ship — or sleeper agents were somehow broadcasting its position.

        Or perhaps that’s what the Cylons wanted you to think. It would be a very wise tactical decision for the Cylons to let the humans think they’ve destroyed the tracking device. The Olympia is then no more than a red herring.

        Remember, the Cylons didn’t even attack the Olympia even though it didn’t make the jump with the rest of the fleet.

        Wasn’t it empty when Apollo did his fly-by?

  2. bombadil says:

    Water planets
    One thing that bugs me- if it is easy enough to find a planet with water – they did it in a few hours/days – why hasn’t that planet already been colonized? Why aren’t there more than 12 colonies? It would make sense that with a population in the billions and advanced space technology other nearby discoverable planets would at least have small colonies on them.

    • Timeshredder says:

      Good question

      – why hasn’t that planet already been colonized?

      The original series had any number of mini-colonies, which were usually left alone after they served the plot needs of the ep. Obviously, running into a small colony would be a much bigger issue in this new series.

    • J_W_W says:

      Re: Water planets

      One thing that bugs me- if it is easy enough to find a planet with water – they did it in a few hours/days – why hasn’t that planet already been colonized? Why aren’t there more than 12 colonies? It would make sense that with a population in the billions and advanced space technology other nearby discoverable planets would at least have small colonies on them.

      Umm, the planet (moon actually) with the water was made up of ice over a water ocean. Not exactly a “habitable” planet.

  3. Trekkie says:

    My Reactions
    I was out of town during the preview, and the following episodes so this is my first chance to comment after watching three straight hours back to back on my TiVo.

    For me the above commented on low points were at best the high points of other SF that is on TV. I mean each one of these didn’t have me groan saying ‘oh god, not this plot again’ as they were each pretty solid stories.

    The humanization of Lee having to blow up a cruiser when they couldn’t tell if it had real humans on it anymore or not in 33…The Boomer thing in Water, where she knew something is up with herself but somehow stopped herself from killing herself with the detonator.

    And on the not yet reviewed episode the implication that there will be elections when the tenure is up. Something they never really did in the old series, the ‘civillian government’ was a bunch of robed morons who only ‘tied the hands’ of the military vs. being run by the civillians.

    All in all, I can’t wait for Friday now. Very exciting. It almost makes up for them cancelling Farscape.

    • Timeshredder says:

      Re: My Reactions

      For me the above commented on low points were at best the high points of other SF that is on TV

      No question, the low points of the first two eps haven’t been particularly low, when compared to “other SF that is on TV.”

      But Trekkie, does this mean you’ll have to change your name?

      • Trekkie says:

        Re: My Reactions

        But Trekkie, does this mean you’ll have to change your name?

        Yeah, I’ve been having that quandary for a few years now. Old habits die hard, been using that alias since 1986 or so.

    • vanyel says:

      Re: My Reactions

      All in all, I can’t wait for Friday now. Very exciting. It almost makes up for them cancelling Farscape.

      I have to agree, especially with last Friday’s episode — they’ve really set a high standard with a lot to look forward to.

      • Eldhrin says:

        Re: My Reactions

        All in all, I can’t wait for Friday now. Very exciting. It almost makes up for them cancelling Farscape.

        I have to agree, especially with last Friday’s episode — they’ve really set a high standard with a lot to look forward to.

        What’s even more amazing is that they continue to deliver episodes to the same high standard. You will love the rest of the season.

        My concern now is for two things. Firstly, did Kobol’s Last Gleaming Part Two download while I was at work today, and secondly, will they make a second season?

        • OrangeCarrot says:

          Re: My Reactions

          All in all, I can’t wait for Friday now. Very exciting. It almost makes up for them cancelling Farscape.

          I have to agree, especially with last Friday’s episode — they’ve really set a high standard with a lot to look forward to.

          What’s even more amazing is that they continue to deliver episodes to the same high standard. You will love the rest of the season.

          My concern now is for two things. Firstly, did Kobol’s Last Gleaming Part Two download while I was at work today, and secondly, will they make a second season?

          To answer your first question, probably, moreover you won’t believe the ending. And I think we need to rephrase your second question: “Will they finish making the first season?”, Kobol 2 is only episode 13. Last time i checked a season on television has anywhere between 23 and 26 (+-) episodes.

          • nycgeoff says:

            Re: My Reactions

            Kobol 2 is only episode 13. Last time i checked a season on television has anywhere between 23 and 26 (+-) episodes.

            Actually, many cable shows have only 13 or so episodes per season. “The Shield” “Rescue Me” “Monk” “The Sopranos” etc.

          • LordJavac says:

            Re: My Reactions

            All in all, I can’t wait for Friday now. Very exciting. It almost makes up for
            them cancelling Farscape.

            I have to agree, especially with last Friday’s episode — they’ve really set a
            high standard with a lot to look forward to.

            What’s even more amazing is that they continue to deliver episodes to the
            same high standard. You will love the rest of the season.

            My concern now is for two things. Firstly, did Kobol’s Last Gleaming Part Two
            download while I was at work today, and secondly, will they make a second
            season?

            To answer your first question, probably, moreover you won’t believe the
            ending. And I think we need to rephrase your second question: “Will they
            finish making the first season?”, Kobol 2 is only episode 13. Last time i
            checked a season on television has anywhere between 23 and 26 (+-)
            episodes.

            This season started (in the US, at least) in January, which is when the second
            half of the other shows on Sci-Fi are starting, thus I expect season one to be
            a half-length season (common enough, just look at Buffy). It’s kinda being
            presented like a mid-season replacement. I would expect subsequent
            episodes to be classified as “season 2” (which will, hopefully air in June/July
            with the next season of the Stargates).

          • babasyzygy says:

            Re: My Reactions

            And I think we need to rephrase your second question: “Will they finish
            making the first season?”, Kobol 2 is only episode 13. Last time i checked a
            season on television has anywhere between 23 and 26 (+-) episodes.

            No.

            A season is however many episodes the broadcaster orders. The most
            common number is in the low 20s for a full year’s episodes, 13ish for a mid-
            season replacement or a “limited series,” but there are other numbers.

            The 4400, for
            example,
            had only 5 episodes for its first season and will have 13 for its second, simply
            because that’s what USA decided to order. And unfortunately, Sci Fi and Sky
            One only chose to commit the money to buy 13 episodes for Battlestar
            Galactica
            ‘s first season.

          • Eldhrin says:

            Re: My Reactions

            To answer your first question, probably, moreover you won’t believe the ending. And I think we need to rephrase your second question: “Will they finish making the first season?”, Kobol 2 is only episode 13. Last time i checked a season on television has anywhere between 23 and 26 (+-) episodes.

            I also recall that many shows are commissioned for short first seasons while the studios decide whether it’s been well-received enough to justify shelling out for a full second season. Buffy The Vampire Slayer is one such example of a short first season followed by normal-length seasons.

            Of course, it was nowhere near as good as BSG.

  4. Eldhrin says:

    I just saw the end of the season…
    …if anybody has heard anything about season two being made, please let me know! I don’t want it to stop here!!!

    • Eldhrin says:

      Re: I just saw the end of the season…

      …if anybody has heard anything about season two being made, please let me know! I don’t want it to stop here!!!

      I can now answer my question… Sci-Fi have a BSG blog on their website for the series in which work on scripts for Season Two is mentioned.

      Also, Ben Browder mentions shooting SG-1 across the street from BSG, and he’s in SG-1 season nine… promising, I think :-)

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