Author Archives: JD DeLuzio

David Anthony Kraft, R.I.P.

David Anthony Kraft, comic-book writer, rock journalist, SF/fantasy publisher, and creator of Comics Interview, has died after a prolonged battle with COVID-related pneumonia. He was 68 years old.

Kraft wrote for several companies, and many remember him best as one of the writers who introduced social issues into his comic-book stories. He had particularly memorable runs on The Defenders and She-Hulk.

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Penguicon– online!

Missing SF conventions? Michigan’s Penguicon, a meeting of SF/Fantasy Fandom, Techies, Open Source Coders, Hackers, and general nerds-at-large goes online this year, with a cost of only $10:00. It actually opened yesterday, but it really doesn’t take off until tonight, and there’s still a lot of virtual space available.

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Novel Review: A Desolation Called Peace

Arkady Martine’s debut novel A Memory Called Empire received multiple award nominations and won the Hugo for best novel. The first in a series, it was followed in March of 2021 with this novel, with more of the conflicts and intrigue involving the future Teixcalaanli Empire, the “barbarian” human settlements in its environs, and some very interesting extraterrestrials.

The more you explore your reality, internal and external….

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Hugo Nominees Announced

The 79th World Science Fiction Convention has been delayed until December 15-19, 2021, when it is hoped more real-world event can take place. DisCon III will be held in Washington, DC, and the Hugo nominees for this year include:

Best Novel

Black Sun, Rebecca Roanhorse (Gallery / Saga Press)
The City We Became, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit)
Harrow the Ninth, Tamsyn Muir (Tordotcom)
Network Effect, Martha Wells (Tordotcom)
Piranesi, Susanna Clarke (Bloomsbury)
The Relentless Moon, Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor Books)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form

Birds of Prey, written by Christina Hodson, directed by Cathy Yan (Warner Bros.)
Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga, written by Will Ferrell, Andrew Steele, directed by David Dobkin (European Broadcasting Union/Netflix)
The Old Guard, written by Greg Rucka, directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood (Netflix / Skydance Media)
Palm Springs, written by Andy Siara, directed by Max Barbakow (Limelight / Sun Entertainment Culture / The Lonely Island / Culmination Productions / Neon / Hulu / Amazon Prime)
Soul, screenplay by Pete Docter, Mike Jones and Kemp Powers, directed by Pete Docter, co-directed by Kemp Powers, produced by Dana Murray (Pixar Animation Studios/ Walt Disney Pictures)
Tenet, written and directed by Christopher Nolan (Warner Bros./Syncopy)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

Doctor Who: “Fugitive of the Judoon”, written by Vinay Patel and Chris Chibnall, directed by Nida Manzoor (BBC)
The Expanse: “Gaugamela”, written by Dan Nowak, directed by Nick Gomez (Alcon Entertainment / Alcon Television Group / Amazon Studios / Hivemind / Just So)
The Good Place: “Whenever You’re Ready”, written and directed by Michael Schur (Fremulon / 3 Arts Entertainment / Universal Television, a division of Universal Studio Group)
The Mandalorian: “Chapter 13: The Jedi,” written and directed by Dave Filoni (Golem Creations / Lucasfilm / Disney+)
The Mandalorian: “Chapter 16: The Rescue”, written by Jon Favreau, directed by Peyton Reed (Golem Creations / Lucasfilm / Disney+)
She-Ra and the Princesses of Power: “Heart (parts 1 and 2)”, written by Josie Campbell and Noelle Stevenson, directed by Jen Bennett and Kiki Manrique (DreamWorks Animation Television / Netflix)

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Review: Them: Covenant: Episodes 1-2

Amazon released its latest genre show on April 9. In the fashion of American Horror Story, each season will tell a different horror tale. Viewers will likely be reminded of other series as well, and not always to the show’s benefit. We’re reviewing the first two episodes and seeing if there’s interest in future reviews.

Despite the title, don’t expect giant ants (or the camp villains from Wonder Woman’s past). In the postwar era, an African-American veteran, his traumatized wife, and their children1 flee horrific racism in the south and settle in Los Angeles, where they discover horrific racism. You can move into a new suburban house, but old ghosts may still haunt it.

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